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Infantry Firepower Questions


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#41 Bob Benge

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Posted 21 September 2011 - 04:27 AM

All,

I would like to go live with the new calculations for infantry numbers. As such, I need to make sure I didn't have any other unknown issues. So if you have the numbers and have any other recommendations please post them to here so i can give them a look. I want to start the update process next weekend.
~ Bob Benge ~
ODGW Designer
Product Manager - Mein Panzer

#42 Mark 1

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 09:25 PM

You missed something!!! (exactly what I don't know!)

Bob:

So far from my examination (sorry, no play testing to report) the numbers all look good to me.

But ... if you are going to go through one more time before putting it into the download area, you might try a quick look over the weapons you have chosen for the Soviets.

You give the Soviet automatic rifle squad the AVT-40. I think you mean to give them the SVT-40. The SVT-40 was a semiautomatic Tokarev rifle model, of which some 5.7 million were made prior to and during the war. The AVT-40 was a selective-fire full-auto varient of this rifle, with a larger magazine, which was intended to replace squad-level LMGs (much as the US Army tried with the M14 in the early 1950s). It saw only limited production starting in 1943, and was not considered a success.

Also for the Soviet SMG you have chosen the PPD-34. This was a Degtyarev design, the first Soviet SMG, almost a direct copy of the German Bergman MP-28. It also was not considered a very successful design, being too complicated and not reliable enough, and had been officially replaced in production by the start of the war by Shpagin's PPSh-41. It was the PPSh which was produced in larger numbers than any other SMG in the world, and provides the "typical" weapon we think of when picturing the mid- to late-war Soviet soldier, with wooden stock, rectangular vented barrel sleave, and 71-round drum magazine. The other major wartime SMG was the Sudayev design, the PPS-42, with a folding metal stock and bannanna clip. Degtyarev's SMG was hardly seen after the first year of the war.

Don't expect any of the numbers to change because of this. At game scale an SMG is an SMG. But you might consider changing to the right names, so newbies to the rules don't decide that they can't use their Soviet army because they have all the wrong weapons, or some such... :huh: :P

bwahahahahaha


(I suspect Kenny knows enough wargamers that his hollow, sarcastic, ringing laugh carries a lot of wisdom with it.) <_<

-Mark 1
_________________
Mark 1

#43 Bob Benge

Bob Benge

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 03:14 AM

Bob:

So far from my examination (sorry, no play testing to report) the numbers all look good to me.

But ... if you are going to go through one more time before putting it into the download area, you might try a quick look over the weapons you have chosen for the Soviets.

You give the Soviet automatic rifle squad the AVT-40. I think you mean to give them the SVT-40. The SVT-40 was a semiautomatic Tokarev rifle model, of which some 5.7 million were made prior to and during the war. The AVT-40 was a selective-fire full-auto varient of this rifle, with a larger magazine, which was intended to replace squad-level LMGs (much as the US Army tried with the M14 in the early 1950s). It saw only limited production starting in 1943, and was not considered a success.

Also for the Soviet SMG you have chosen the PPD-34. This was a Degtyarev design, the first Soviet SMG, almost a direct copy of the German Bergman MP-28. It also was not considered a very successful design, being too complicated and not reliable enough, and had been officially replaced in production by the start of the war by Shpagin's PPSh-41. It was the PPSh which was produced in larger numbers than any other SMG in the world, and provides the "typical" weapon we think of when picturing the mid- to late-war Soviet soldier, with wooden stock, rectangular vented barrel sleave, and 71-round drum magazine. The other major wartime SMG was the Sudayev design, the PPS-42, with a folding metal stock and bannanna clip. Degtyarev's SMG was hardly seen after the first year of the war.

Don't expect any of the numbers to change because of this. At game scale an SMG is an SMG. But you might consider changing to the right names, so newbies to the rules don't decide that they can't use their Soviet army because they have all the wrong weapons, or some such... :huh: :P



(I suspect Kenny knows enough wargamers that his hollow, sarcastic, ringing laugh carries a lot of wisdom with it.) <_<

-Mark 1


Thanks Mark! I will make these changes.
~ Bob Benge ~
ODGW Designer
Product Manager - Mein Panzer

#44 Bob Benge

Bob Benge

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 10:34 AM

Numbers are being crunched. I have finished the numbers and have updated the SCW and almost done with WW1. Hope to have this job done on all books before end of year... We'll see :)
~ Bob Benge ~
ODGW Designer
Product Manager - Mein Panzer




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