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Determing Attack Wave Arrival


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#1 Jahan

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:50 PM

Hello, I am planning on using the simplified campaign air ops rules for representing air combat on the tactical board. I am wondering if there is a simple mechanic that anyone has for determining how many and on which turn the attack waves arrive to simulate the uncertainty with spotting and search of planes?

For example I am looking for a simple D12 roll to determine the number of waves or something that affect.

Thanks in advance

#2 Lonnie Gill

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 08:36 PM

Hello, I am planning on using the simplified campaign air ops rules for representing air combat on the tactical board. I am wondering if there is a simple mechanic that anyone has for determining how many and on which turn the attack waves arrive to simulate the uncertainty with spotting and search of planes?

For example I am looking for a simple D12 roll to determine the number of waves or something that affect.

Thanks in advance


G’ Day Jahan,

You’ve asked a very good question that no one has brought up yet. Sorry for the delayed reply. I had thought someone would respond while I was tied up finishing Amendment 2. There are actually two answers.

If you are using the streamlined Campaign Air Ops approach, the timing of air strike waves is not an issue, as tactical maneuvering of aircraft and ships is not simulated. Air strike waves can be done in any convenient order. After resolving CAP intercept, if applicable, the attacking commander assigns flights to targets within the limits of the Target Max table. AA fire by the designated target and escorts is defined as noted on the Air Strike Sequence, listed on the CAMPAIGN AIR OPS chart. Amendment 2 has now added the potential for CAP interception as surviving flights withdraw.

Alternately, when using the detailed Tactical Air Ops approach, the timing of specific waves is important. The ideal was to have waves arrive at the same time for a combined attack, which would split defending CAP response by direction and altitude and limit surface ship maneuvers to avoid torpedo bombers vs. dive bomber and other types of attacks. However, that proved difficult to pull off in combat due to many factors such as distance, weather, different flight profiles for various types of strike aircraft and even personal relationships between formation commanders. Recent books, such as A Dawn Like Thunder, have described how personal enmity between squadron and air group commanders on the carrier Hornet played a part in the destruction of Torpedo 8 at Midway. More of that probably took place in WW II than ever makes the history books!

Given all the variables, the best approach would be to dice for each strike wave’s arrival in the tactical area. Roll two D12s for each wave composed of regular or green aircrews. The results will indicate which wave arrives first and the difference in the results will indicate how many one minute Air Phases (one-third of a Game Turn) later the next wave arrives, etc. The staggered arrivals can have a significant effect on whether CAP flights can react to the next wave and ship formations alter course in time. When using the new Amendment 2 optional rule Section 2.18 for Aircrew Quality, roll only one D12 for each wave composed of Veteran aircrews to reflect their greater probability of making a coordinated attack.

LONNIE

#3 gregoryk

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Posted 16 June 2011 - 09:36 AM

G’ Day Jahan,

You’ve asked a very good question that no one has brought up yet. Sorry for the delayed reply. I had thought someone would respond while I was tied up finishing Amendment 2. There are actually two answers.

If you are using the streamlined Campaign Air Ops approach, the timing of air strike waves is not an issue, as tactical maneuvering of aircraft and ships is not simulated. Air strike waves can be done in any convenient order. After resolving CAP intercept, if applicable, the attacking commander assigns flights to targets within the limits of the Target Max table. AA fire by the designated target and escorts is defined as noted on the Air Strike Sequence, listed on the CAMPAIGN AIR OPS chart. Amendment 2 has now added the potential for CAP interception as surviving flights withdraw.

Alternately, when using the detailed Tactical Air Ops approach, the timing of specific waves is important. The ideal was to have waves arrive at the same time for a combined attack, which would split defending CAP response by direction and altitude and limit surface ship maneuvers to avoid torpedo bombers vs. dive bomber and other types of attacks. However, that proved difficult to pull off in combat due to many factors such as distance, weather, different flight profiles for various types of strike aircraft and even personal relationships between formation commanders. Recent books, such as A Dawn Like Thunder, have described how personal enmity between squadron and air group commanders on the carrier Hornet played a part in the destruction of Torpedo 8 at Midway. More of that probably took place in WW II than ever makes the history books!

Given all the variables, the best approach would be to dice for each strike wave’s arrival in the tactical area. Roll two D12s for each wave composed of regular or green aircrews. The results will indicate which wave arrives first and the difference in the results will indicate how many one minute Air Phases (one-third of a Game Turn) later the next wave arrives, etc. The staggered arrivals can have a significant effect on whether CAP flights can react to the next wave and ship formations alter course in time. When using the new Amendment 2 optional rule Section 2.18 for Aircrew Quality, roll only one D12 for each wave composed of Veteran aircrews to reflect their greater probability of making a coordinated attack.

LONNIE

The opposed D12 approach is a good one for determining when the waves arrive— their arrival time is important for CAP effects as Lonnie points out.




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