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Gun Fire damage tables


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#1 Brian Aldridge

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 02:49 PM

On the Austrian gun fire table there is a listing called Italian shells. I have looked throught the rules and cannot find any reference to how that works.When resolving hits. Do you use the firing Damage table or the Targets one?Belisarius

#2 Cpt M

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 05:00 AM

When resolving hits. Do you use the firing Damage table or the Targets one

You use the Damage Table of the target.

On the Austrian gun fire table there is a listing called Italian shells. I have looked throught the rules and cannot find any reference to how that works.

If you look closely on the A-H Damage Table, you'll notice under the 'B*-CA' column on a roll of '10' the the result is '1/2 Hull' on a white background and 'Eng' on a green background. This is read as '1/2 Hull + Eng' for Italian shells and '1/2 Hull' for all others.

#3 Lonnie Gill

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 09:59 AM

One clarification. An Italian shell hitting an Austro-Hungarian B* or CA will result in an Engineering hit instead of a Hull hit. You will find the same notations for Russian shells on the HSF GUNFIRE DAMAGE table. These reflect the effect of the more stable, non-pictric acid based explosives used by the Russians and Italians which enabled them to penetrate deeper into a B* or CA target before exploding. A hit by the more sensitive British or French shell would detonate before penetrating very far into the target. Thus a British or French hit would result in only a Hull hit while an Italian or Russian shell would penetrate deeply enough to result in an Engineering hit instead. You will also note that only Engineering hits are listed for cooresponding "10" results in the B* CA column of British, Italian and Russian damage tables for hits by German and Austro-Hungarian shells which also employed a more stable explosive. Since these opponents all used more stable shells, it was not necessary to make a distinction on the British, Italian and Russian tables.Finally, the practical effect of these differences in explosive stability are limited to the fairly large, but inadequatley armored B* and CA targets. Dreadnoughts were considerably larger and better armored. Even though more stable shells penetrated deeper, their engineering spaces were far enough from the target's ship side or deck that shells fired at the low trajectories employed in WW I exploded before reaching them. Thus, the BA - BD columns do not have an Engineering hit result. Smaller and unarmored ships, on the other hand, lack the distance from ship sides/decks and armor to protect their engineering spaces from large caliber hits.My appologies that this was not more clearly explained in the FAI text.LONNIE

#4 Brian Aldridge

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Posted 04 June 2008 - 04:03 PM

Thanks LonnieAppreciate the answer.Belisarius




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