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Rule 7.2.6 Reverse


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#1 Brooks Witten

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Posted 15 January 2020 - 03:23 AM

I do like the rule in that "A ship must be at a complete stop for one Game Turn before she can reverse."
 

However I do question the Maximum speed of 5 knots.

During USS TEXAS 'delayed' acceptance trials in 1914 she was required to operate at full speed for four hours, then maintain 19 knots for the remaining twenty-four hours.

After that, they put her helm hard over to port, then starboard, to determine her turning radius.  Then came her final test

They rang up full steam astern.  I'll let Paul Schubert, "COME ON, TEXAS"  finish what happened

"Slowly and steadily she brought up, slow, slower,
  . . . stop . . .
and began to gather sternboard, to go aft faster and faster until she was making sixteen, seventeen knots astern . . . ."

 

Just looking for an explanation to deny a real world capability in the rules.



 



#2 Cpt M

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Posted 23 January 2020 - 09:19 PM

While Texas' astern speed is impressive, keep in mind, that this was done during her acceptance trials.  During such trials, a ship will be put through many extreme maneuvers, some of which would never be performed in other circumstances.  Full speed astern would be one of these for a variety of reasons, such as difficulty with steering.  As far as I know, there is no evidence that any navy considered astern sailing as part of their tactical doctrine.  Such was reserved for moving about a harbor  or mooring.  As impressive as Texas' feat is, it has little bearing on her capabilities in combat.


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#3 Brooks Witten

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 03:40 AM

Thank you for your reply.  And I do understand the thought process.
However US Navy "tactical doctrine" did foresee the use of full astern.

Pictured is USS YORKTOWN in 1943 recovering a torpedo bomber while moving full astern.
(When moving astern the ship hull acts as a rudder and any deviation of course comes from varying port or starboard engine speed)


Attached File  recoveryasternyorktown1943.jpg   51.27KB   0 downloads

Please do not interpret this as a wish to change Air Operations rules





 



#4 Cpt M

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 05:45 PM

I'm quite familiar with the photo of Yorktown recovering an aircraft over the bow while steaming astern.  According to the record, this photo was taken during her shakedown cruise in May 1943.  The procedure was considered strictly an emergency procedure and, according to a crewman who served aboard her for the entire war, this was the only time it was ever done.  While feasible, it was considered highly impractical. 


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#5 healey36

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Posted 31 January 2020 - 11:55 AM

Been at this for quite awhile, and I can't recall a single instance of wanting/needing to throw something into reverse.

 

Healey

 

 



#6 midelburgo

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Posted 20 July 2020 - 04:23 PM

Hi newbie here. I used to play a little GQ2 30 years ago and I am discovering GQ3.3 and FAI.

 

About reverse, SMS Seydlitz made the last leg of the trip from Jutland to Wilhelmshaven in reverse, because her bow was underwater. It will be easy to calculate what speed was reached, even with all the damage.



#7 Brooks Witten

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Posted 27 July 2020 - 12:39 AM

I do understand rules not allowing 'questionable' practices.  But the reverse rule is ripe for a 'house rule' modification.
On June 22, 1944 the battleship MARYLAND was torpedoed on her starboard bow.  She proceeded to Eniwetok and was ordered to Pearl Harbor for repairs.

She sailed the entire way in reverse at an average speed of 10 knots in order to keep the strain off the forward bulkhead.
 

An important feature of the US capital ships which were equipped with the turboelectric propulsion system is thus completely written out of the rules.
But as I stated at the first, the rules are easily adaptable if parties playing are agreeable to 'historic' proofs of capabilities.

 






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