Jump to content


Photo

collisions


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 tripper

tripper

    Private

  • Members
  • 31 posts

Posted 27 May 2016 - 03:33 AM

How does the collision rule work for ships that are less than 200yds spacing in line of battle. Do the ships just tele port if they collide and become locked together.



#2 Brian Weathersby

Brian Weathersby

    Sergeant

  • Members
  • 112 posts
  • Locationnear Houston, Texas

Posted 06 June 2016 - 11:50 AM

I've been wondering about this myself.



#3 tripper

tripper

    Private

  • Members
  • 31 posts

Posted 07 July 2016 - 05:37 AM

Can anyone tell me how 15.53 collisions work please. As i cant see many disadvantages to a green crew for sailing



#4 Brian Weathersby

Brian Weathersby

    Sergeant

  • Members
  • 112 posts
  • Locationnear Houston, Texas

Posted 17 June 2017 - 01:52 AM

I've been thinking about this on and off, and wonder if maybe it isn't a typo.  Perhaps it should be 20 yards instead of 200?  That would be 60 feet, or about 1/2 inch in 1/1200 scale.  Or maybe it should be 200 feet (2 inches/67 yards in real life) instead of 200 yards.

BWW



#5 Cpt M

Cpt M

    Colonel

  • ODGW Staff
  • 920 posts

Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:07 PM

I've been thinking about this on and off, and wonder if maybe it isn't a typo.  Perhaps it should be 20 yards instead of 200?  That would be 60 feet, or about 1/2 inch in 1/1200 scale.  Or maybe it should be 200 feet (2 inches/67 yards in real life) instead of 200 yards.

BWW

The 200yds separation refers to ships operating in a line ahead formation.  200yds (or 2 cables) was pretty much the standard that most navies used in the period (especially with the notoriously unwieldy 1st to 4th rates).  Also, keep in mind that 200yds is barely 2 shiplengths, a distant that could be covered fairly quickly.   The ability to maintain station in formation is a highly value skill (even today), and even moreso in the sailing period (where you're entirely dependent on wind and wave and working with fairly unresponsive ships).  A good sailing master with a good crew could do so with relative ease thanks to long experience and training, while crews with scarcely any training or experience could not.  Still, with the vagaries of wind and wave, even the best could be caught out resulting in ships closing and opening the desired interval.  Consequently, as stated in section 15.3 The LINE states:

 

"Collisions-  Ships with Regular or higher quality crews can
take avoiding action if the spacing is reduced and resume
position in the following Tactical Phase. However, when
a 1st- 4th rate warship with a Green or Raw crew closes
within 200 yds of a friendly vessel ahead, an immediate

Collision Check is required."

 

So Regular and Crack crews merely resume their position the following phase while Green and Raw crews suffer a collision check.  This reflects the better crews' ability to respond to the inevitable closing and opening of the line (and the less trained crews inability to do so).



#6 Brian Weathersby

Brian Weathersby

    Sergeant

  • Members
  • 112 posts
  • Locationnear Houston, Texas

Posted 21 June 2017 - 02:07 PM

You know, I completely missed the first sentence in that section.  I wish we had an embarrassment emoji in the forum, as this is clearly the time for it to be used.  I guess I'll have to go with this instead: :blink: .  This now makes something like Ca Ira colliding with Victorie at Cape Noli much more likely on the tabletop, and answers the question in another thread about the disadvantages of green crews sailing in line.

BWW



#7 tripper

tripper

    Private

  • Members
  • 31 posts

Posted 30 March 2019 - 08:21 AM

I am looking to start using the rules again and i still cannot see how this works , has anyone a working example of the sequence of events please.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users